Dr. Fauci on his proudest moment from the pandemic so far — and the darkest

Dr. Fauci on his proudest moment from the pandemic so far — and the darkest

I think it fitting to sum up this year commenting on the pandemic.  The pandemic and the election dominated the news, and probably most of our interest this strange and trying year.  I’ve already commented last post about what I thought about Trump and Trumpism- the ideology.  I damn the ideology while I pray for the man.  I’m looking forward to noon on January 20th, 2021 when according to our constitution, that man is no longer the president.

Anyway, let’s give the last word to someone who’s become a hero to me – Dr. Anthony Fauci.  In this article from CNBC and during an interview with the Center for Strategic and International Studies Commission on Monday Dr. Fauci shared what was his proudest moment and his darkest moment of 2020.  His proudest moment was the successful development of a vaccine for Covid-19.  From the article:

“That is a historic, unprecedented achievement,” Fauci said. Vaccines typically take 10 to 15 years to develop, but the initiative “Operation Warp Speed” allowed American businesses, scientists, the federal government and the military to collaborate and accelerate the process.”

As Fauci notes, it was the collaboration of business, government, and the military that allowed the remarkable achievement to occur.  The extremist notions from either end of the spectrum- that ONLY private enterprise – or ONLY government have the solution was dramatically exploded by the accomplishment.  Collaboration is the key- an important lesson to be learned going forward.

The article also said:

That said, the year was also full of dark moments, particularly for people on the front lines fighting the pandemic.

The U.S. is recording at least 213,700 new Covid-19 cases and at least 2,400 virus-related deaths each day, based on Johns Hopkins University data. January is projected to be the worst month yet, and cases are expected to peak. The U.S. death toll topped 300,000 on Monday.

Fauci said that the “extraordinary burden of disease and death in this country” represent his darkest moments of the year.

It is my fondest hope for the new year that Americans rally together to do the necessary steps to end this pandemic as soon as possible. Fauci said:

 “Those are the things that, as a physician scientist and a public health official, are very painful,” he said.

The numbers and “the enormity of the problem, it just can actually overwhelm you,” Fauci told CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta during a panel Wednesday.

Focusing on the problem at hand, ending the pandemic, is how Fauci stays motivated. “I focus like a laser on what I need to do,” Fauci said Monday.

Great advice from a great man.  Let’s take it.

21 thoughts on “Dr. Fauci on his proudest moment from the pandemic so far — and the darkest

  1. “The best way to meet a crisis is forewarned and forearmed.”

    Yep.

    Both the Bush and Obama admins had been forearming and developing a play book for such a time as we’ve seen this year. The play book was conveyed to the tRump admin by Obama. Of course, the berserk orange headed child in the Oval Office disdains anything touched by the black man and the play book was discarded.

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  2. “That is a historic, unprecedented achievement,” Fauci said. Vaccines typically take 10 to 15 years to develop, but the initiative “Operation Warp Speed” allowed American businesses, scientists, the federal government and the military to collaborate and accelerate the process.”

    Yes, it’s historic that the vaccines were brought to market so swiftly, and, as already noted, R&D has been going on for decades.

    BUT…the really really historical thing that many do not realize is that there has never in history been a vaccine against a corona virus developed.

    Approximately 15-20% of the “common cold” are caused by a corona virus. Perhaps a partial cure for that is in the tubes?

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  3. Around 230 million on the low side. How many of those would die? Even if the death rate is only about 1%, that’s still a lot of people dead.

    Over TWO MILLION, if you take the 1% number.
    However if the hospitals and ICUs overload (like in Italyy, New York, and Mexico), there won’t be enough medical facilities to treat the REAL bad cases and you’ll see the fatality rate climb to 3-5%, i.e. SIX TO TEN MILLION DEAD.

    Remember the scene from Nosferatu with the two solid lines of pallbearers carrying coffins down a street, extending almost to the horizon?

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  4. ‘convenience’ taking precedence over the value of human life?

    even one life matters, and that is what people don’t get – they think ‘statistics’ but it’s someone’s mother or father or family member or dear friend – a human person who has to suffer and die

    no, they DON’T ‘get it’ and that is heartbreaking

    Sweden regrets its ‘herd immunity’ attempt – too much loss of innocent life

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  5. Amen! It was the opposite of the perfect storm. I guess the perfect confluence of amazing scientific discovery at just this time of pandemic. Of course it goes back before this time, which is your point, but has popped into life and onto the scene with vigor as a salvation for all of us.

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  6. > we need to encourage and publicly fund science for the sake of science.

    +1,000

    The best way to meet a crisis is forewarned and forearmed.

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  7. Definitely. I read in the news recently where the Pfizer CEO said this was not a one year or an 18 month process, but a 17 year process. I don’t remember the exact wording, but that was the gist. And my science teacher wife also reminded me that researchers have been working with and testing MRNA vaccines in the lab for some years, well before the pandemic hit.

    It’s also a good reminder of why we need to encourage and publicly fund science for the sake of science.

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  8. People talk about herd immunity but most that I have encountered have no idea what that really means. From what I have researched, true herd immunity is not achieved until 70-80% of the population has had the disease. The US has a population of about 328 million so how many would have to have the virus to achieve that herd immunity? Around 230 million on the low side. How many of those would die? Even if the death rate is only about 1%, that’s still a lot of people dead.
    It’s insanity! But I have had conversations recently with people who still think letting the virus rip through the population is the best way to deal with it. Many claim to be pro-life.
    I am just going to let that sit.

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  9. All true. If history is any guide ~2 years from now this will be a distant memory; we will be on to, or have resumed, some other crisis. Also Mr. Trump is 74 years old and over-weight. Take some comfort in that.

    I’m glad we are where we are today with all this; and the real credit for this belongs to people whose names we will never know, who labor in both laboratories and drab Federal office buildings.

    The ability to pile-drive through the bureaucracy was/is a true accomplishment.

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  10. But we are cowboy country, we think “letting it rip” and “riding it out” is the way to get through a crisis like this one.

    While the Christians chorus “AAAAAAAAA-MENNNNNN!!!!!”
    Hell-bent on being part of the problem, not part of the solution.

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  11. I’m certainly glad for the rapid development of vaccines but just for the record it should be pointed out that research and development for these vaccines began well before the rollout of the “Operation Warp Speed” initiative and this in the face of denial from our political leadership. We will have the pleasure of hearing people take credit for the development of a vaccine for a pandemic they spent the last year actively discrediting.

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  12. It really is miraculous and I am very grateful to the amazing people who did and amazing job. If Trump gets any credit, so be it. Extraordinarily appreciative of the scientific and medical communities. Now shoot me in the arm. Twice.

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  13. To all the intelligent, skilled, and honest public servants who kept at it through the indignity of the last four years I raise my morning grape juice. Thank you.

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  14. This is no surprise. It’s been apparent to me that this administration’s goal was letting the disease spread as far and fast as possible, in the name of attaining quick herd immunity, no matter what they’ve said to the contrary. And they’ve succeeded in letting it spread, and getting the American public to go along with spreading it. Herd immunity, however, is nowhere in sight yet, not until enough people are vaccinated. If we were another kind of country, we would’ve had strict national guidelines and regulations for quarantine and shutdowns, and a generous social safety net — including guaranteed healthcare for all — so that folks could stay home and still survive economically, especially those at high risk. But we are cowboy country, we think “letting it rip” and “riding it out” is the way to get through a crisis like this one. As a result, we will have a tremendously high death toll not only in comparison to similarly wealthy countries, but to even the poorest of the poor nations worldwide. We have the resources, but lack the will and goodness to handle this pandemic humanely and effectively.

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  15. YES, it’s great advice. Now we can hear Dr. Fauci’ voice more clearly as he will be a leader in the new administration to fight the virus. Donald Trump won’t be able to silence him after Inauguration Day. Thank God.

    This has come out and it is a terrible indictment of the Trump administration:
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jemimamcevoy/2020/12/16/we-want-them-all-infected-trump-appointee-repeatedly-pushed-for-herd-immunity-while-at-hhs/?sh=35e9795d7a05

    all those packed meetings and parties and rallies and
    now we know the trumpist reason:
    ‘WE WANT THEM ALL INFECTED”

    – it doesn’t get any worse than that against a population where many vulnerable people are at risk for death

    – oh, the inhumanity

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